Comments Off on Water and the War on Terror

http://www.grist.org/article/2010-03-02-water-and-the-war-on-terror/

 

The terror-ble, horrible, no good, very bad freshwater crisis

While leaders in Washington have been war-gaming the national security risks of climate change, they’ve only started to connect the dots to the closely related threats emanating from the growing crisis of global freshwater scarcity. At first blush, water and national security may not seem to be interlinked. But the reality, as narrated in my new book WATER: The Epic Struggle for Wealth, Power, and Civilization, is that the unfolding global water crisis increasingly influences the outcome of America’s two wars, homeland defense against international terrorism, and other key U.S.national-security interests, including the transforming planetary environment and world Geo-political order.

 

Squirt gun.

Former U.N. Secretary-General Boutros Boutros-Ghali famously predicted 25 years ago that the “next war in the Middle East will be fought over water.” While that has yet to come to pass, the greatest present danger stems from failing nation-states—and not just in the bone-dry Middle East. With world water use growing at twice the rate of human population over the last century, many of the Earth’s vital freshwater ecosystems are already critically depleted and being used unsustainable to support our global population of 6.5 billion, according the2005 Millennium Ecosystem Assessment, and the situation can only be expected to get worse as the population pushes toward 9 billion by 2050. As great rivers run dry before reaching the sea, ground water is mined deeper and deeper beyond replenishment levels, and water quality erodes with growing pollution, an explosive fault line is cleaving between freshwater Haves and Have-Nots across the political, economic, and social land scape of the 21st century.

Among the water Have-Nots are the 3.6 billion who will live in countries that won’t be able to feed themselves within 15 years due largely to scarcity of water—likely to include giant India.Throughout history, states that have been unable to feed them selves with home grown or reliably imported cheap food have stagnated, declined, and often collapsed, with grievous adjustments in living standards, population levels,and regional turmoil.

Everyone, try and get a Berkey Water System, with extra filters.  More on this story, read it by following the link.

 

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